Settling the debate: Raising Cane’s vs Boss Chicken

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Settling the debate: Raising Cane’s vs Boss Chicken

Lina Duchene

Lina Duchene

Lina Duchene

Lina Duchene, Editor-in-chief

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When fast food chain Raising Cane’s opened four years ago, it struck all chicken tender lovers in the heart. Shortly after, locally owned chain Boss Chicken and Custard emerged and created an unsettled debate – who is better? Each restaurant, although similar, encompasses its own identity and taste.

The tenders at Raising Cane’s are unlike any other. On the multiple occasions I have visited Cane’s, my order is always fresh. The steam coming from the tenders is comforting. The order did not sit under a heat lamp for an extended period of time. In addition to the main entree, the side of Crinkle-Cut fries and Texas toast that comes with every combo has just the right amount of crispiness shown by a golden brown color.

Cooled on crunchy and satisfying crushed ice, the hand-squeezed lemonade at Cane’s is a refreshing beverage that does not disappoint as it harbors the proportionate balance of sweet and sour flavors.

Above all, the famous Cane’s Sauce serves as the perfectly flavorful and unique complement to already tasty tenders. The Box Combo, which includes four tenders, fries, coleslaw, Cane’s Sauce, Texas toast and a regular drink is $6.98 – a fair price for a well made, satisfying meal. Additional Cane’s Sauce is an extra $.29, a reasonable price for a novelty.

People may be drawn to Boss Chicken and Custard because of its locality and uniqueness to the city but that should be the only reason it gains any customers at all. Their marked similarity to Cane’s is what may draw customers but those expectations will just lead to disappointment. Unlike the crispy, fresh, chicken fingers at Cane’s, the ones at Boss are not as fresh. The breading falls off the chicken, leaving the customer with a handful of plain, white meat. The side of hand cut fries is almost always soggy and tasteless, one wonders if the fries are actually fried to order, which is what the menu claims.

The Boss Sauce, an imitation of Cane’s Sauce, is quite similar and fair tasting but useless once the fried breading falls off of the tender. The Texas toast is usually crispy and buttery but is the only good tasting item on the overpriced $8.29 combo; which includes the same contents as the Cane’s Box Combo, excluding the side of coleslaw. Aside from the tenders, Boss’ homemade limeade and variety of homemade teas which includes coconut, mango and regular flavors is unique, satisfying and tasty.

To settle the debate, Raising Cane’s takes the prize with better chicken tenders. Although Cane’s only has four El Paso locations while Boss has six, it is worth the long lines to get a better tasting, higher quality meal than to support a local chain that does not serve its customers well.

 

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