Promposals pose problems


In the school theater April 23, junior Seth asks senior Sabrina to prom on stage during theater Study Skills.

Moises Guevara

In the school theater April 23, junior Seth asks senior Sabrina to prom on stage during theater Study Skills.

Moises Guevara, Reporter

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Prom season is here and that means, “Promposals.” The idea of going all out to ask someone to prom is overrated and pretentious. Due to social media influence, promposals are sadly quite popular. Too many issues arise with promposals at school. They do more harm than good.

Many students like promposals because of its “fun” factor, but it isn’t always fun for everyone. Senior Carol Jayme has friends that haven’t been asked to prom and seeing others being asked makes hard. Prom season should be a fun time for everyone. Jayme says a simple invitation to prom in private is fine; going all out in front of other students who haven’t been asked is inconsiderate to others. Jayme said that promposals also cause unnecessary pressure.

The pressure of having to plan an over-the-top promposal and doing it in front of the school can be nerve-racking not only for the person asking but for the person being asked. Junior Amber Garcia said the attention that comes with being asked can be uncomfortable. This could lead to the person asking being rejected causing both public embarrassment.

Math teacher Luis Andrade said promposals are distracting to students. When students go into his class room with a dozen balloons or a bouquet of flowers for a promposal it disrupts class. Promposals hinder a student’s ability to learn, and must not be allowed at schools.

Students that want to prompose can easily ask in private and save themselves a lot of trouble. Prom is meant to be an enjoyable time for the whole school and should not be ruined by potential problems that come with promposals.