Budget woes plague organizations

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Itzel Viramontes

Choir secretary Samantha Velarde checks on one of many 10-year-old choir dresses.

Itzel Viramontes, Head Photographer

From old dresses to tennis nets that don’t hold on right, organizations all over the school struggle with lack of equipment. To deal with the things the school budget doesn’t cover, organizations have to fundraise to provide for what the school cannot.

“We have to fundraise for uniforms, music, trip fees, contest fees, accompanist fees, sound equipment, microphones, speaker wires, things like that,” choir teacher Dr. Lisa Serna said.  

The budget is based on what the school thinks is appropriate.

“We are lucky that we have Mr. Acuña who is supportive of the fine arts, if we are in need of something he will go above and beyond to allocate the money,” Serna said. “We are very blessed to have his support.”

In many cases there is not enough money for these organizations.

“A lot comes out of my own pocket, I buy a lot of things with my own money,” Serna said.

Many teachers struggle with this problem.

“It’s never enough (money) but it’s more than I think most teachers get as far as what I’ve heard from other art teachers but it seems like our student to classroom ratio is really high,” art teacher Raul Monarrez said. “The demand of wanting to provide students the opportunities to do things like AP takes a lot of funds because they consume a lot of the materials so the budget gets cut really quick. A lot of times I have to cover things from my own pocket.” 

Organizations fundraise year-round to provide for the lack of equipment.

“This year we sold chocolates, last year we sold candy, right now we’re in the process of doing our singing telegrams so hopefully we can make some money from that,” Serna said.

Organizations try to make equipment last as much as they can.

“Right now I’m trying to purchase new gowns for our varsity choir,” Serna said. “Typically uniforms run on a seven-year turn around and my girls are now running on a 10-year, we really need to get some new uniforms for those girls.”

Not having the proper equipment or uniforms affects the way these organizations perform.

“If you’re in a beautiful new choir gown you’re going to feel different than if you’re in a 10 year old gown that’s been stitched up, tucked in, let out, not hemmed properly, and zipper’s broken,” Serna said. “I think it definitely affects the way you perform.”

Worn down equipment doesn’t just affect the fine arts but other sports and clubs too.

“We did not have enough rackets or tennis balls so not everyone could practice,” varsity tennis player Brandon Nava said.

With enough money students have the opportunity to participate more.

“It limits their experience, if I only have money to buy pencils and paint then that’s all they’ll do but if we’re able to buy clay, carving tools, gouges and other things like that they can go into other arts, more than just building with paper,” Monarrez said.

Students recognize the need to fundraise.

If you’re part of the organization it’s good to help out to contribute to the team,” Nava said. 

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